Jump to content
  • 0

accurate results of a child's evaluation when child is known for not trying or caring while at school


ashleydrew
 Share

Question

Back ground information to help understand what I am asking:

So, my stepson is in 7th grade, he has spina-bifida and is wheel chair bound.. He was been wrongly miss placed in self contained classes since PK and misidentified for having intellectual disability around 4th grade.

He has lived with us going on four years now. I have finally managed to have the school reevaluate him and they determined he wasn't intellectually disabled. (That's why we wanted a new eval)They claim his new IQ score is a 74 & previously on other records it says IQ is anywhere from 44-58. With his new IQ score being a 74 they will not consider him to have dysgraphia, dyslexia, or anything of that sort because his IQ score is below average.  They told me he has to have a normal IQ to have one of those disabilities. The school and I both know my step son has been known to "act dumb" or pull the " I don't feel good or I am tired card" when ever it comes to any school work, thinking if he does it long enough he will not have to complete whatever it is. This is primarily because he got his way in self contained classes and never was required to do anything. But, now at home we don't give up and we push him.

My child knows how to do 4 digit by 4 digit multiplication without a calculator.. yet school tells me he can't recall 2 out of 9 steps when it comes to multiplication of 2 by 2 digits. I have had to video record him doing the work at home so they would believe me.  My child likes to see what he can get away with...

With that information  being  known, is there anyway for me to ask the school to re-evaluate  him and me possibly be in the room? If I am with him he does 90% of his work and it will be quality work, if I am not around he rushes through work and does not think things out. I feel like because of that his evaluations are not 100% accurate. 

I am not one of those parents that would try to help him or be a distraction to him during this process. I could simply be outside the room where he knowns I am there & he would still produce more quality work than he would alone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 1
  • Moderators

You can ask for anything, but it's up to the school whether they'd allow you to be in the room seated in a corner while they give your child tests. How does he do on academic tests/quizzes when you aren't at the school? Do his scores improve if an aide/teacher is close to him while he takes the tests? Has the district evaluated all areas of concern (perhaps executive functioning, behavior, adaptive skills) in addition to their cognitive testing?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1

When it comes to IQ, in PA where I live, above 130 is gifted and below 70 is intellectually disabled.  An IQ of 74 does not qualify for intellectually disabled services where I live so I would think he'd qualify for remedial services.  Given his history, I feel an IEE is in order since he's gotta be close to their 'average' cutoff for IQ.

I'm curious what state you live in that uses a different cut off for IQ.  Do they offer gifted programs starting at an IQ of 125?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

If the school evaluated and you disagree with their results, you may request an Independent Educational Evaluation (IEE) at district expense. This may not be the answer since schools don't have to do anything but consider the outside results but it may at least give you better information as to his needs.

Also, remember that all services, goals, accommodations and placement are based on NEEDS so I'd thoroughly look through the present levels section of the IEP and really identify where his needs are, whether they are academic, behavior, social or living skills. If there are additional needs not addressed, make sure you include those in the comprehensive parent concerns letter you write to have included in the IEP section. (Always, always write a parent concerns letter). Sometimes just focusing on the needs will allow you to make the changes that you want. For example, it sounds like you want more inclusion in general ed so include in your parent concerns letter why you feel this is appropriate and build your case with objective data. What are some examples of times he's been in an inclusive setting and what were the benefits? 

Edited by Angela Tyszka
  • Like 1

Michigan mother of two with IEPs, and owner of MI Student Advocacy Services. Trying to change the world one IEP at a time. 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use