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Basic question because I might be losing my mind


RobinT
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Hi,

I am a therapist in Delaware and frequently refer parents and students to request an evaluation through their school when we suspect ADHD. Every time a girl requests this evaluation the school comes back to say they have reviewed her grades and based on that they don't think she needs an evaluation. Clearly there is still a whole lot of confusion about the differences in presentation between boys and girls but am I mistaken in thinking that if a parent requests an evaluation the school is obligated to complete one despite something like good grades? What is going on that schools decide whether or not they want to evaluate?

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7 hours ago, RobinT said:

J,

I can refer for a medical evaluation but not sure in other places but here schools won't accept medical diagnoses and medical people won't accept school diagnoses. It's maddening!

Exactly but don't forget when IDEA said they don't recommend the discrepancy method you can use classwork or outside tutoring work to help identify students correctly. 

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The child study team can set criteria for which students need evals.  With ADHD, boys tend to have more obvious (read misbehavior) symptoms so the school tends to be faster to offer support.  Since you are a therapist, do you work with anyone who you can refer patients like this to?  IMO, a medical diagnosis of ADHD can help get a student a 504 or IEP and the right school support.  Another thing is to have the parents track (write out) all the EF things they do to help their daughter manage better at school.  Hopefully, with more data on the student's ability, the school will do the right thing.

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I always thought that a written request meant an evaluation. Though is it ever interpret as "we will look into it"?

I could also see the school team arguing there is no need for accommodations if she's accessing the material sufficiently. Hence, the good grades. But the argument could be made that she is still struggling to achieve those good grades.

 

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She has pretty severe behavior problems, impulsivity, poor emotional regulation, executive dysfunction, RSD, depression, anxiety, mood swings, etc. She basically is a poster child for what we understand ADHD to be. I feel confused as to why schools aren't up to date on what ADHD is beyond the idea of poor grades. Of course, I just suspect that they don't want to provide services

 

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1 hour ago, RobinT said:

She has pretty severe behavior problems, impulsivity, poor emotional regulation, executive dysfunction, RSD, depression, anxiety, mood swings, etc. She basically is a poster child for what we understand ADHD to be. I feel confused as to why schools aren't up to date on what ADHD is beyond the idea of poor grades. Of course, I just suspect that they don't want to provide services

 

It usually isn't about the diagnosis but its effect on learning. It's not the school's job to treat her but make sure she has equal access to education. I'd have the parents document how all of that is impacting her ability in the classroom.

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7 hours ago, RobinT said:

Hi,

I am a therapist in Delaware and frequently refer parents and students to request an evaluation through their school when we suspect ADHD. Every time a girl requests this evaluation the school comes back to say they have reviewed her grades and based on that they don't think she needs an evaluation. Clearly there is still a whole lot of confusion about the differences in presentation between boys and girls but am I mistaken in thinking that if a parent requests an evaluation the school is obligated to complete one despite something like good grades? What is going on that schools decide whether or not they want to evaluate?

Sounds like they're using the discrepancy method which idea said isn't recommended in 2004. 

Mostly this was because schools used to say that dyslexic students couldn't also be gifted which isn't true. 2e twice exceptional is very real and ADHD is included too. 

Schools need to be reminded that it's their obligation under child find to identify these students that we know exist. 

image_2794a391-912e-4a3d-8587-2f04bbe34b2620221031_151511.jpg

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