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Parenting kids with Dyslexia


Christy McGuire
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On 10/11/2022 at 11:21 PM, Christy McGuire said:

The article really resonates for me. What else do you think people don't realize about raising kids with Dyslexia etc?

 

https://www.understood.org/en/articles/7-things-i-wish-people-knew-about-parenting-kids-with-dyslexia?_sp=78baebda-7e93-419b-b416-ffeafbf7914f.1665544102116

Some things I would add are 

1 dyslexia doesn't just end at the end of the school day. It can effect other areas of life like talking to friends processing directions. 

2 dyslexia does not just mean a complete inability to read even when they learn how to read they may still have trouble reading they may have read something more than once to understand they may only be able read things of high interest to them. They my have trouble understanding complicated text. 

3 it can be emotional exhausting at times 

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21 hours ago, Kendra mackenzie said:

Some things I would add are 

1 dyslexia doesn't just end at the end of the school day. It can effect other areas of life like talking to friends processing directions. 

2 dyslexia does not just mean a complete inability to read even when they learn how to read they may still have trouble reading they may have read something more than once to understand they may only be able read things of high interest to them. They my have trouble understanding complicated text. 

3 it can be emotional exhausting at times 

 

CM

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I don't feel that parents really want 'the best for their child' (#6 in the article).  When a student is the best in their class, that can come with another set of issues like boredom.  A student who isn't being taught anything new doesn't learn how to learn.  When things get harder and they lack this ability, self-esteem tends to take a hit.  The end result is a gifted child not reaching their full potential as well as the mental health issues that come with low self-esteem.  They may end up setting a low bar for themself because they feel they don't know how to get to a higher bar.

What I've said about middle school is students want to fit in yet stand out at the same time.  IMO, parents want this too.  They want their child to have a 'just right' education.  There needs to be a bit of struggle for growth to happen and a student with the need for special ed needs to be identified early so they don't stand out..like being the only one who hasn't finished the chapter when the discussion starts.

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2 hours ago, JSD24 said:

I don't feel that parents really want 'the best for their child' (#6 in the article).  When a student is the best in their class, that can come with another set of issues like boredom.  A student who isn't being taught anything new doesn't learn how to learn.  When things get harder and they lack this ability, self-esteem tends to take a hit.  The end result is a gifted child not reaching their full potential as well as the mental health issues that come with low self-esteem.  They may end up setting a low bar for themself because they feel they don't know how to get to a higher bar.

What I've said about middle school is students want to fit in yet stand out at the same time.  IMO, parents want this too.  They want their child to have a 'just right' education.  There needs to be a bit of struggle for growth to happen and a student with the need for special ed needs to be identified early so they don't stand out..like being the only one who hasn't finished the chapter when the discussion starts.

Yeah, I agree, I didn't want my child to "be the best". I will admit to wanting them to have the best, which in my mind was eauivalent to happy.

I haven't met many Dyslexic families who feel the dyslexics faced only "some" struggle though.

CM

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